No surprise for the leading duo, but a surprising surge of the Green Party and a collapse of the traditional opposition parties, with a much higher voter turnout.

If the results of the first two lists, Jordan BARDELLA’s far-right Rassemblement National (23.31%) and the Renaissance list of the presidential majority (LREM) led by Nathalie LOISEAU (22.41%) are more or less in line with what was announced by the polls, this Sunday’s vote brought some surprises, not unusual in French politics since the last presidential election.

The first of the surprises is of course the high electoral turnout. At 50.12%, it was above the 2014 rate (42.43%), and well above the estimations of recent weeks (42-46%). Despite the social protest embodied by the movement of the Gilets Jaunes, and the National Debate which occupied the media space until mid-April, it would seem that this election mobilized a lot of people, as it did in other European countries.

The second surprise is the strong push of Yannick JADOT’s Green party (13.47%), which was not expected to exceed 10% and nevertheless achieved a good performance. The Green party EELV tends to perform better in the European elections, which generally give a high priority to environmental issues, but largely exceeds its 2014 score (8.95%).

The third surprise is the sharp drop of the right-wing Les Republicains list, represented by François-Xavier BELLAMY (8.48%) who is credited with leading a good campaign, and which, with the poor score of the left-wing list led by Raphaël GLUCKSMANN (6.19%), marks the continuation of the traditional parties’ erosion, which started with the last presidential election of 2017. The score of the far-left list La France Insoumise led by Manon AUBRY is also surprising, since it only received 6.31% of the votes, whereas Jean-Luc MELENCHON collected nearly 20% of the votes during the last presidential elections. Nevertheless, the left-wing parties (PS) still managed to get candidates elected despite the predictions arguing that they could possibly not gather 5% of the votes.

What conclusions can be drawn for the French political landscape ? Certainly, the far-right score is not good news for the majority, but Marine LE PEN’s party does not exceed its historical scores in this election (24.86% in 2014), and only beat the Renaissance list by 1 %. The Renaissance list can boast about having succeeded in blocking the far right, despite a rather bad campaign from Nathalie LOISEAU, and despite the attacks it may have suffered from all the other parties. Moreover, the collapse of the traditional parties shows La République En Marche remains the only party able to oppose the RN. Emmanuel Macron clearly stated that this result is not a defeat and reaffirmed his commitment to pursue his political agenda. The government should therefore not be too heckled by this result, and it is eventually not sure that it will lead to a ministerial shuffle.

GREENS 13 MEPs – up 7

Ecolo emerge one of the big winners in France with 13 seats

GUE (6 MEPs)

Mélanchon's party only get 6 seats and fail to reach heights of his presidential vote

ALDE (21 MEPs – 23 after Brexit)

Renaissance win 21 seats - but will have to wait for Brexit for 2 additional seats

S&D 6 MEPs – down 7

PS just survive the 5% threshold and return 6 MEPs

EPP (8 seats) down 12

LR see massive drop from 20 to just 8 seats, with many sitting MEPs casualties of the bad…

ENF (22 MEPs

RN came on top of the election with 22 seats

ECR ( 0 MEPs)

Debout la France, under the leadership of Nicolas Dupont-Aignan, have signed an agreement…

OTHER

The "gilets jaunes" have formed a list for the EP elections headed by one of their most…

☕️ Rendez-vous demain matin pour écouter @faureolivier ⏰ 8h15 📺 dans #LaMatinale sur @CNEWS.

Dans le cortège parisien de la manifestation pour la #grevedu5decembre, @StephanTroussel, secrétaire national aux nouvelles solidarités, dénonce « l’entourloupe » de la réforme des #retraites du Gouvernement 👇

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