For the UK, the result must be seen through a binary lens and are as instructive for domestic politics in Britain as they are for the future European institutional mandates. Voters who participated were either making strong statements on delivery of Brexit or on the wish to Remain (via a second referendum instrument). As expected, the Brexit Party led by ex UKIP leader Nigel Farage (whose switch) won comfortably with a third of the vote from the Leave voting demographic from 2016, killing UKIP as a political force in the process. The pro second referendum Liberal Democrats and the Green Party had strong showings, gathering another third from largely Remain supporting areas.

The Conservative Party and Labour (the two largest parties in the UK Parliament) had their vote squeezed by considerable margins, with defectors to parties with more clear Brexit positions. Despite caveats in how much these results can be translated into General Election results domestically, they will have huge influence on the positions of the parties in the coming months (with factions on all sides arguing the result shows they need a clearer position in their direction) and on the Conservative leadership race in particular where fear of the results by Conservative MPs may boost Boris’ prospects.

In Scotland, the SNP have had a good night, reversing some decline in their support in recent years and potentially strengthening their demands for a second referendum on both Brexit and Scottish independence as part of any future coalition deal in the UK Parliament.

On a European Parliament front, the question will be how are these parties going to behave in the coming decisions over key institutional leadership positions and Parliamentary groupings. The Brexit Party (the UK’s largest delegation) has promised not to actively participate except to prevent a bad deal against the UK so it remains to be seen how they play alongside some of the other European populist groups. Will they just vote on Brexit matters or play a more active role in the politics of the EU in the next three months now we now that there is unlikely to be a deal in place by then that will prevent the need for UK MEPs to take their seats?

It also strengthens Macron’s argument in particular that Brexit needs to be finished quickly and decisively but his new Liberal Democrat partners in the ALDE grouping will work hard to prevent the idea getting too much traction. The Liberal Democrats, Greens and SNP will work in a more constructive manner within the Parliament’s more constructive blocs and may help strengthen some of the centre-left and liberal groupings’ hands over the summer as the horse trading begins. Longer established returning Conservative and Labour MEPs (who suffered from their parties’ ambiguity on Brexit and lack of manifesto) will have a smaller role to play and it is yet to be seen how active they will be in the next Parliamentary mandate. As ever, for the European Parliament, the mixed UK result can be read by wider Europe, and Barnier and Brexit negotiations, in particular, in whichever way they might want it to be read. Encore Article 50 extensions might be the name of the game.

Greens 6 MEPs

SNP Party members are due to vote on the order of their candidates, which include current…

New party

Prominent names for Change UK include Stephen Dorrell (Health Secretary in the John Major…

EFDD 19 MEPs

Nigel Farage’s new Brexit party looks on course to be the biggest group in the elections…

ALDE 1 MEP

The LibDem list contains their 1 current MEP, Catherien Bearder, but also a number of…

ECR 19 MEPs

The Conservative lists are headed by 14 of the sitting 19 MEPs and they are projected to…

S&D (20 MEPs)

Labour have published their lists of candidates, with 15 of the 18 sitting MEPs topping…

EPP (0)

Two Tory MEPs moved to the EPP at the end of the last parliament - Julie Girling and…